Offer Negotiations

In all my dealings, I have never come across a situation where a company has completely undercut on an offer, when realistic and justified salary expectations were clarified from the onset.

Sal Exp 1As per “Don’t be afraid to state your Salary Expectations” this is why I advocate transparency, it offsets a lot of apprehension and anxiety associated with negotiations.

If you have completed a skills matrix, you’ll know exactly what boxes you are ticking in relation to their requirement, being a ‘fit and likable’ will also give you more negotiation room, and if you have articulated how and why you can deliver on the role requirements in the interview based on achievements to date; your offer should be no surprise when presented.

Should a company be deliberating on an offer, you have time to reflect on what additional information you have garnered throughout the interview process.  It is likely, you are not ticking all the boxes but have strong potential and having gone through various meetings with them, you are aware of this too.

At this point you want to determine what level of flexibility you will have based on what else the company can offer.  Should they come back with a figure lower than expected (but still within market rates); you want to stay open minded to their reasoning and listen to their justification.  If you need time to think, tell them, but be reasonable and give appropriate time lines for getting back to them.

When faced with this situation here are some questions to ask yourself:

  • Think longer term; what career progression, training and development can the company provide to you?
  • What new project or work experience will you gain from the position?
  • Will you be working with new technologies?
  • Does the company provide a benefits package that would alleviate current independent expenditure?
    • If the company cannot move on base salary due to salary scales; can they increase benefit contributions?
      • Performance bonuses, signing bonuses, salary review timelines, stock options, health and pension contributions, flexible working hours &/or increase in holidays, paid professional certifications…..etc.
  • Is the location closer to you or will you move to accommodate, reducing transport costs?

Do not lose out on the right role with the right company solely because of the €€€€

Think about the Job on offer, not just the salary, and negotiate clearly defined parameters and metrics to get you to where you want to be as quickly as possible.

sal neg 2

Pay Scales –  If they need you to get in line with pay scales of their own staff – query what training, development and certifications (if any) are required to get you to where you need to be and associated timelines (you want specifics).

Salary Review – At your 6/12 month review agree to a renegotiation of salary and ensure this is documented with clearly defined parameters of expectations and delivery within the 6/12 month time frame.  As long as you have met the terms, it would be very difficult for them to justify not giving the increase.

Benefits – discuss what benefits are on offer and negotiate terms that may be more preferential to you with justified reasoning.

Address everything at the same time, not independently.  If you ask for something and they agree and come back to you expecting an offer acceptance, but then you add two more things to the list, this will only frustrate the situation.  Outline what you are looking for in order of preference making this clear. If there is further negotiation to be done on these terms you are likely to get at least one of the most important agreed.

No matter what, whether accepting or declining the offer, be courteous and thank them for their time and consideration.  You never know what may come from it in future, they have presented an offer because they are interested in you.  If things haven’t worked out this time, parameters may chance in future and you may be invited back to the table. Always keep the door open!

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